Womens Rights

Sports • Football
Soccer: Brazil to give equal pay to men's and women's national players
Soccer: Brazil to give equal pay to men's and women's national players
Credit: Lucas Figueiredo/CBF

Brazil's women's national players will be paid the same as male players for representing their country, Brazil's football association (CBF) has said.

All players will be granted the same daily and prize amounts for taking part in preparation periods and games.

Rogério Caboclo, CBF president, stated: "What men will receive at the next World Cup will be proportionally equal to what is proposed by FIFA. There is no more gender difference, as the CBF is treating men and women equally."

Politics • American • US
Trump pardons campaigner for women's suffrage Susan B. Anthony 114 years after death
Trump pardons campaigner for women's suffrage Susan B. Anthony 114 years after death
Credit: Engraved by G.E. Perine & Co., NY (Public Domain)

US President Donald Trump has pardoned women's rights activist Susan B. Anthony, who had been convicted of participating in the 1872 presidential election. Trump announced the move on Tuesday at a celebration of the 100th anniversary of the right to vote for women in the USA at the White House.

Anthony's trial in 1873 fired up the women's movement in the United States and she had been sentenced to a fine. In August 1920 with the 19th Amendment to the American Constitution the United States introduced the right for women to vote. Anthony died in 1906 at the age of 86.

Science • Nature
Survey: Women in large German cities face threats and harassment
Survey: Women in large German cities face threats and harassment
Credit: unsplash.com / Markus Spiske

According to a survey by the children's aid organization "Plan" among 1,000 respondents between 16 and 71 years of age, the fear of harassment, threats, and insults is great. Big cities like Berlin, Hamburg, Cologne or Munich stand out here. One in five respondents stated in the survey that they had been the victim of a crime such as insults, threats or harassment. Girls and women feel most unsafe on the open street, followed directly by public transport and parks.

Technology • Internet & Web
Former COO sues Pinterest, accusing it of gender bias
Françoise Brougher
Françoise Brougher Credit: Pinterest

Françoise Brougher, Pinterest’s former COO, has filed a lawsuit accusing the company of gender discrimination. Brougher is suing the company to hold it “accountable for discrimination, retaliation, and wrongful termination in violation of the Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), and the Labor Code,” according to a Tuesday filing in San Francisco Superior Court.

Brougher, who was abruptly fired from the company in April, states in the lawsuit that she had a less favourable equity compensation package than her male peers. She also claims that she was also left out of crucial decision-making by other executives, was subjected to a hostile work environment, and ultimately fired by CEO Ben Silbermann when she spoke up against her treatment.

Politics • European • European Union
Violence against women: Poland to leave European treaty
Zbigniew Ziobro
Zbigniew Ziobro Credit: Ryszard Hołubowicz (Creative Commons Attribution 3.0)

The justice minister of Poland, Zbigniew Ziobro, has announced that his country will leave the Istanbul Convention - a treaty that aims to prevent violence against women.

He claims that it "contains elements of an ideological nature" as it requires all signed countries to teach children about gender.

Women across the country have protested on thousands.

Politics • Asian
Bridal kidnapping into forced marriages to be made illegal, Indonesian officials vow
Multiple men kidnap a woman to force her into marriage
Multiple men kidnap a woman to force her into marriage Credit: Screenshot of viral Twitter video from December 2019

After two cases of bridal kidnapping have been filmed and posted to social media platforms where they went viral, Indonesian officials have vowed to ban the practice. The practice is established in Sumba, a southern island in Indonesia where family members or friends of a man who wants to marry a woman kidnap her and bring her directly to the ceremony.

According to local historian Frans Wora Hebi "There are no laws against it, only sometimes there is social reprimand against those who practice it but there is no legal or cultural deterrent" adding that the practice is not part of any traditions but a way to force women into marriage.

Regional leaders in Sumba have now signed a declaration stating that they reject the practice and Indonesia's women's empowerment minister Bintang Puspayoga stated that there will be a government effort to end the practice.

Politics • Middle Eastern
Court in Saudia Arabia rules that a woman living alone is not a crime
Riyadh Skyline
Riyadh Skyline Credit: B.alotaby (Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 4.0)

Prosecutors had pursued a woman in Saudia Arabia for travelling to Riyadh without permission and thus being absent from her family.

The court has now ruled that the woman being in a separate home is not a punishable crime as the "woman is a sane adult who has the right to decide where she wants to live".

Abdulrahman al-Lahim, one of the lawyers involved in the case, has stated that "A historic ruling was issued today, affirming that independence of a sane, adult woman in a separate house is not a crime worthy of punishment".