Immigration

Politics • American
Canadian court rules that United States aren't a "Safe Third Country" anymore
A border marker at the US-Canada border at the Northwest Angle of Minnesota / Manitoba
A border marker at the US-Canada border at the Northwest Angle of Minnesota / Manitoba Credit: Tony Webster (Creative Commons Attribution 2.0)

The Safe Third Country Agreement (STCA) has been ruled invalid by a federal court in Canada. Under the agreement asylum seekers trying to cross the Canada-U.S. border are sent back to the respective country to apply in the first country they have arrived in for asylum.

Canadian federal court judge Ann Marie McDonald has now ruled that the United States do not qualify as "safe" anymore but has suspended her ruling for six months to give the legislative branch of the government time to respond. In her ruling, she points out that the agreement violates parts of Canada’s Charter of Rights which state that principles of fundamental justice need to be conformed to regarding laws and state actions that influence life, liberty and security.

Politics • European • Germany
Stuttgart is discussing a structured survey of the migration background
Stuttgart is discussing a structured survey of the migration background
Credit: NTV (Reproduction)

The criminologist Tobias Singelnstein criticizes the collection of the "family tree" among the identified perpetrators of the riots in Stuttgart. In juvenile criminal law - which will probably be used these cases - due to the educational concept, it is necessary to find out about family backgrounds, but the immigration background demonstrably does not say anything about the crime.

He is facing headwind from CDU politicians who justify this investigative approach by the fact that it could initiate preventive measures.

Education • University Education
Universities filed a lawsuit against Trump administration over directive stripping foreign students of their F-1 visas
Universities filed a lawsuit against Trump administration over directive stripping foreign students of their F-1 visas
Credit: Photo by Senthil Balasubramanian. – U.S. Department of Energy from United States / Public domain

In a move that was considered to pressure universities to reopen, the Trump administration announced a directive on Monday that would force international students to return to their home countries if all of their classes and coursework were taken remotely.

"It appears that it was designed purposefully to place pressure on colleges and universities to open their on-campus classrooms for in-person instruction this fall, without regard to concerns for the health and safety of students, instructors, and others," so Lawrence S. Bacow, President of Harvard University.

In response to the directive, Harvard and M.I.T have filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration, seeking "a temporary restraining order and preliminary and permanent injunctive relief preventing Defendants from enforcing the policy announced in ICE’s July 6 Directive, or promulgating it as a Final Rule" and "a declaration that the policy announced in the July 6 Directive is unlawful."

Politics • American • US
Trump temporarily suspends work visas
Donald J. Trump during a roundtable discussion in the State Dining Room of the White House, June 8, 2020
Donald J. Trump during a roundtable discussion in the State Dining Room of the White House, June 8, 2020 Credit: The White House from Washington, DC / Public domain

On Monday, Donald Trump signed an executive order to temporarily suspend new nonimmigrant work visas through 2020, barring foreigners to seek employment in the United States. The order freezes many different work visas, including H1-B (foreign workers in special occupations), H-2B (seasonal nonagricultural workers), J-1 (scholars and professors participating in cultural exchange programs) and L-1 (used to transfer existing employees to offices in the US).

Politics • American • US
Trump plans on suspending work visas through an executive order
President Trump
President Trump Credit: The White House (Public Domain)

Officials have announced that the US President Donald Trump is about to sign an executive order that will suspend the issuance of H-1B visas, H-2B visas, H-4 visas, L-1 visas and certain J-1 visas through 2020. Affected groups are skilled workers working in fields such as the technology sector, seasonal workers and spouses of H-1B visa holders. According to an official, the measures would affect half a million jobs.

Politics • European
Prime minister Johnson urges EU workers to come back to the UK
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City, September 2019
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City, September 2019 Credit: The White House from Washington, DC / Public domain

The prime minister of the United Kingdom Boris Johnson has urged EU workers to come to the United Kingdom once the retail sector will re-open. This comes after Johnson campaigned before the Brexit referendum vote to reduce the number of as he phrased it "low-skilled workers" in the country. Him now saying "but we want you back" marks a change in policy.

Politics • Asian
Boris Johnson announces that Hong Kongers will be able the become citizens of the UK
Boris Johnson
Boris Johnson Credit: Pippa Fowles / no 10 Downing Street.

The British Prime Minister has announced that the new security law imposed by China on Hong Kong "would curtail freedoms and dramatically erode its autonomy" and that the United Kingdom, in case that the law passes, will make "one of the biggest changes in our visa system in British history" in order to enable holders of the British National (Overseas) passports longer stays without a visa and easier access on the path to citizenship.

Politics • European
Portugal government announces to treat migrants as residents during Covid-19 pandemic

In order to allow migrants and asylum seekers, that are currently living in Portugal, access to the public services of the country during the coronavirus pandemic, the government has announced to treat them as residents. Being treated as such they can use social security services such as healthcare or welfare, but also open bank accounts, close rental contracts and work. The only requirement is an ongoing request for residency.