Cancer

Health
Scientists have developed a blood test to diagnose prostate cancer
Scientists have developed a blood test to diagnose prostate cancer
Credit: Dotodot (Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 4.0)

Scientists from the Monash University School of Clinical Science, the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, the Chris O'Brien Lifehouse and Predicine, a biotech company from California have developed a blood test for the diagnosis of prostate cancer in men.

The test is able to profile circulating DNA and RNA shed by cancer cells out of 10ml of blood. This procedure gives insight if cancer has developed and how it is composed, enabling conclusions on which treatment could possibly be the best.

Health
Modified cannabis could potentially kill cancer cells according to research at University of Newcastle
Modified cannabis could potentially kill cancer cells according to research at University of Newcastle
Credit: unsplash.com / Christina Winter

The University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Insitute in Australia have tested a modified strain of cannabis for its abilities to kill or inhibit cancer cells.

Dr Matt Dun researched for three years on the potential treatment of cancer with cannabis containing high levels of cannabidiol (CBD), the non-psychoactive component of the plant. The research was in collaboration with the Australian biotech company ANTG (Australian Natural Therapeutics Group).

Dr Dun has states that they "initially used leukaemia cells and were surprised by how sensitive they were" while the substance speared normal bone marrow cells and healthy white blood cells.

Comparing THC and CBD strains Dr Dun stated that "the CBD variety looks to have greater efficacy, low toxicity and fewer side-effects, which potentially makes it an ideal complementary therapy to combine with other anti-cancer compounds".

Arts, Entertainment, Culture • Celebrities & Public Figures
Ruth Bader Ginsburg has recurrence of cancer, is undergoing chemotherapy
n	 U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks on the Main Stage of the National Book Festival, August 31, 2019. Photo by Shawn Miller/Library of Congress.
n U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks on the Main Stage of the National Book Festival, August 31, 2019. Photo by Shawn Miller/Library of Congress. Credit: Library of Congress Life (Creative Commons CC0 Waiver)

US Supreme Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said she has been receiving chemotherapy for a recurrence of liver cancer, but assured she was "fully able" to continue her post.

Her statement read as followed: "On May 19, I began a course of chemotherapy (gemcitabine) to treat a recurrence of cancer. A periodic scan in February followed by a biopsy revealed lesions on my liver. My recent hospitalizations to remove gall stones and treat an infection were unrelated to this recurrence.

Immunotherapy first essayed proved unsuccessful. The chemotherapy course, however, is yielding positive results. Satisfied that my treatment course is now clear, I am providing this information.

My most recent scan on July 7 indicated significant reduction of the liver lesions and no new disease. I am tolerating chemotherapy well and am encouraged by the success of my current treatment. I will continue bi-weekly chemotherapy to keep my cancer at bay, and am able to maintain an active daily routine. Throughout, I have kept up with opinion writing and all other Court work. I have often said I would remain a member of the Court as long as I can do the job full steam. I remain fully able to do that."

Health
Four your old boy with previous cancer condition has recovered from Covid-19

After being diagnosed with stage four neuroblastoma in January 2019, the four-year-old boy has successfully recovered from the coronavirus. The boy was in the hospital for six days and is now at home with his parents.