Airline Industry

Transportation • Air Transportation & Traffic, Flying
2020-06-28T17:00:02+00:00
Boeing 737 MAX certification flight tests to begin Monday
Boeing 737 MAX
Boeing 737 MAX Credit: Aka The Beav (Creative Commons Attribution 2.0)

Pilots and test crew members from the US Federal Aviation Administration and Boeing aim to kick off Monday a certification test campaign for the 737 Max on Monday, expected to last at least three days.

The 737 Max has been grounded since March 2019, two crashes - a Lion Air flight and an Ethiopian Airlines flight - within five months of each other involving a faulty flight control system, known as MCAS.

Transportation • Air Transportation & Traffic, Flying
2020-06-15T19:30:01+00:00
Swedish and Danish governments to rescue SAS airline
SAS plane at Gothenburg Landvetter Airport, Sweden
SAS plane at Gothenburg Landvetter Airport, Sweden Credit: Miguel Ángel Sanz

The Scandinavian airline SAS presented on June 15 a recapitalisation plan estimated in $1.3 billion. The company's two principal shareholders Sweden, with a 14.8% stake in the carrier, and Denmark, with a 14.2% share, are expected to inject capital to help the airline face the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic.

“The aim of the plan is to ensure that SAS is fully funded and that shareholders’ equity will be at levels reported before the COVID-19 pandemic when anticipated business volumes return to pre-corona levels in 2022,” SAS said in a statement.

Transportation • Air Transportation & Traffic, Flying
2020-06-10T11:30:01+00:00
Airline industry expects a US$84 billion loss in 2020
Aerial view of JFK Airport, New York
Aerial view of JFK Airport, New York Credit: unsplash.com/Miguel Ángel Sanz

The IATA's financial outlook for the global air transport industry is grim. The airline industry is expecting a record loss of US$84 billion and a net profit margin drop of 20 percent with a forecast revenue loss of 50 percent or US$419 billion. IATA's CEO and Director General Alexandre de Juniac said the industry is losing an average of US$230 million per day, calling 2020 'the worst year in the history of aviation'. Assuming there is no 'second and more damaging wave of COVID-19', de Juniac is hopeful that 'the worst of the collapse in traffic is likely behind us'.