Archaeology & History

Science • Archaeology & History
Archaeologists unravel the mystery of the Paleolithic children's grave in Krems-Wachtberg (Austria)
Archaeologists unravel the mystery of the Paleolithic children's grave in Krems-Wachtberg (Austria)
Credit: Copyright OREA ÖAW

The mystery of the 2005 excavated grave in Krems-Wachtberg in Austria, which is about 31000 years old and in which two skeletons of new-born children were found, was unraveled by Archeologists of the Natural History Museum Vienna and the University Vienna. Gene analytics showed that the two boys, who were buried under a mammoth scapula, were identical twin brothers.

The one boy died during or shortly after birth, the second one about six or seven weeks later. Those children are the oldest recorded identical human twins. A nearby found skeleton of a male toddler of 13 or 14 weeks appears to be related to both brothers - he was their cousin.

Science • Archaeology & History
Doubts about the age of the Nebra sky disk unfounded research group says
Doubts about the age of the Nebra sky disk unfounded research group says
Credit: Munzel52 / via Wikimedia Commons (Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 4.0)

In September 2020, two archaeologists, Rupert Gebhard from the Bavarian State Archaeological Collection in Munich, and Rüdiger Krause from the Goethe University Frankfurt/Main, expressed doubts that the world-famous Nebra sky disk, part of the UNESCO Memory of the world register, which is assumed to be the oldest concrete depiction of the cosmos, really is 3.600 years old, as stated by the state archeologist of Saxony-Anhalt.

Gebhard and Krause claim, that the sky disk is about a thousand years younger and thus from the Iron Age, not the Bronze Age. A research group, consisting of thirteen scientists, now has found more evidence, that the original dating was correct and therefore the doubts are unsubstantial.

Science • Archaeology & History
New insights into the mills of Barbegal
New insights into the mills of Barbegal
Credit: maarjaara / via Wikimedia Commons (Creative Commons Attribution 2.0)

Scientists at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz got new insights into the famous mills of Barbegal, which date from the Roman imperial age. The sophisticated techonology of the mills is a strong indicator for industrial work in the Roman antiquity according to Professor Cees Willem Passchier, lead researcher of the team.

Science • Archaeology & History
New findings indicate female huntresses in Mesoamerican Palaeolithic
New findings indicate female huntresses in Mesoamerican Palaeolithic
Credit: Courtesy of Sciencemag

New findings from the period between 12000 and 6000 BCE, made in South America, indicate that about 30 to 50 percent of women in that period in Mesoamerica have been huntresses and regularly engage in hunts even for big game like mammoths. This stands opposite of common ideas about women being gatherers and men being hunters in the Palaeolithic age.